For managers, conversation skills are crucial

Thursday, March 13th, 2014 By Jack Nevison

You probably have conversations with your project team members on a daily basis. But while these can be enjoyable experiences, you might not be having the right conversations for what you are trying to achieve.

That's the conclusion of a recent article on Inc.com, which argues that it is important to use those discussions to spur team productivity.

"The trick is to think of your office conversations not as idle filler you use to pass the time between meetings, but as tactics to advance your goals," the article read.

The article suggests three ways to make this happen.

First, it is important to converse with people across the company hierarchy. You likely speak regularly to those coworkers who are nearest to you, but if you don't talk to anyone else you might end up with a view of your team that is too narrow. Spend more time speaking with those who work for you, and even those working on different teams altogether. You'll get a better, more well-rounded view of the project.

Second, don't be in such a hurry. It's easy to rush through a conversation, especially if you have a list of things you need to do. However, you may be inadvertently sacrificing an opportunity to connect with team members and glean crucial feedback on your project.

Finally, be prepared to talk, even if you aren't in the mood, or don't think you are good at it. This is a big part of what being a leader is all about.

At New Leaf Project Management, we cover the "soft" skills in addition to the more technical project management techniques in our project management training programs. We also offer you   opportunities to learn while you earn affordable PDU credits for PMP rectification.

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