How can managers properly engage their team members?

Monday, February 3rd, 2014 By Jack Nevison

According to a recent Gallup poll, only 30 percent of the U.S. workforce says that they are engaged by their work. The remaining 70 percent "are not reaching their full potential—a problem that has significant implications for the economy and the individual performance of American companies," according to an article on Inc.com.

Obviously, this is a concern for all project managers, who rely on their team members to be fully committed to their work. However, the article about the poll came up with a name for this problem: "Crushed Culture."

The term means that team members are not being held accountable for their actions. They are not excited to come to work, and take very little initiative beyond the basics. This is not a recipe for success in any organization.

The article suggests several steps that can be taken to cure this malaise. 

"Put energy into someone by sharing what your mission/vision/values really mean, mentor them, talk challenges out with them, pay attention to them, and you'll start to build emotional equity," the article reads.

It is also important to make clear what each team member's career path will be, At Anheuser-Busch, team members get number-and-letter grade from their ongoing reviews. "4A's…must be promoted in a year…1A's are put on a recovery plan." Letting people know where they are on the company ladder, and what growth is needed to climb higher, creates "loyal and engaged" employees.

At New Leaf Project Management, our 2-day program, "Leading the Project Team," can show you how to engage and energize you team. In addition, our QPM games and free white papers let you learn while you earn the PDU credits for PMP recertification.

PMI®," PMP®," and "PMBOK®" are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc. All rights reserved.

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