How not to run a meeting

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013 By Jack Nevison

We've all been there. The meeting started late. Your project manager was rushed that morning, and didn't seem to have much of a grasp on the purpose of the meeting. Not that you could tell for sure, since he didn't bother to distribute an agenda before the meeting.

Poorly run meetings can be a sign that your project is headed for trouble. Poor meetings may even ruin a project.

Sadly, it's easy to be a bad project manager. In fact, an article on The Project Management Hut recently laid out nine warning signs of bad project management. These include managers that seem disconnected from the actual work of the company, or those who have "heroic" attitudes.

Luckily, there are ways to train yourself for better performance.

In a humorous white paper, "How Not To Run A Meeting," New Leaf Project Management explores the ways in which a project manager can doom a meeting.

Many of the problems have to do with poor coordination. As suggested above, it's important for managers to circulate an agenda to give attendees an idea of what will be discussed at the meeting. An agenda lets people know who will be addressing which topic, and gives everyone time to prepare their reports and be ready with any questions or concerns that they may have.

The white paper covers other aspects of good meeting etiquette, such as time limits for speakers on each topic, and the proper way to take and distribute minutes.

Project managers seeking to maintain their PMP® certification can read this white paper, or one of 15 others produced by New Leaf, then assess their knowledge by completing a short post-test. New Leaf awards affordable PDUs for completing these quizzes.

"PMI," PMP," and "PMBOK" are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc. All rights reserved.

"QPM" is a registered mark of New Leaf Project Management. All rights reserved.

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